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The effects of trait and state affect on diurnal cortisol slope among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China
Chen,Lihua1; Chi,Peilian2; Li,Xiaoming3; Zilioli,Samuele4,5; Zhao,Junfeng6; Zhao,Guoxiang6; Lin,Danhua1,7
2017-06-20
Source PublicationAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
ISSN13600451 09540121
Volume29Issue:8Pages:1034-1040
Abstract

Affect is believed to be one of the most prominent proximal psychological pathway through which more distal psychosocial factors influence physiology and ultimately health. The current study examines the relative contributions of trait affect and state affect to the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity, with particular focus on cortisol slope, in children affected by parental HIV/AIDS. A sample of 645 children (8–15 years old) affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China completed a multiple-day naturalistic salivary cortisol protocol. Trait and state affect, demographics, and psychosocial covariates were assessed via self-report. Hierarchical linear modeling was used for estimating the effects of trait affect and state affect on cortisol slope. Confidence intervals for indirect effects were estimated using the Monte Carlo method. Our results indicated that both trait and state negative affect (NA) predicted flatter (less “healthy”) diurnal cortisol slopes. Subsequent analyses revealed that children’s state NA mediated the effect of their trait NA on diurnal cortisol slope. The same relationships did not emerge for trait and state positive affect. These findings provide a rationale for future interventions that target NA as a modifiable antecedent of compromised health-related endocrine processes among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS.

KeywordChildren Affected By Parental Hiv/aids Cortisol Slope Mediation Analysis State Affect Trait Affect
DOI10.1080/09540121.2016.1274015
URLView the original
Indexed BySSCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaPsychology ; Respiratory System ; Health Care Sciences & Services ; Public, Environmental & Occupational Health ; Biomedical Social Sciences
WOS SubjectHealth Policy & Services ; Public, Environmental & Occupational Health ; Psychology, Multidisciplinary ; Respiratory System ; Social Sciences, Biomedical
WOS IDWOS:000403432800015
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Document TypeJournal article
CollectionDEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
Corresponding AuthorLin,Danhua
Affiliation1.Institute of Developmental PsychologyBeijing Normal University,Beijing,China
2.Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social SciencesUniversity of Macau,Macao
3.Department of Health PromotionEducationand BehaviorUniversity of South Carolina,Columbia,United States
4.Department of PsychologyWayne State University,Detroit,United States
5.Department of Family Medicine and Public Health ScienceWayne State University,Detroit,United States
6.Department of PsychologyInstitute of Behavior and PsychologyHenan University,Kaifeng,China
7.School of PsychologyBeijing Normal University,Beijing,China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Chen,Lihua,Chi,Peilian,Li,Xiaoming,et al. The effects of trait and state affect on diurnal cortisol slope among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China[J]. AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV,2017,29(8):1034-1040.
APA Chen,Lihua.,Chi,Peilian.,Li,Xiaoming.,Zilioli,Samuele.,Zhao,Junfeng.,...&Lin,Danhua.(2017).The effects of trait and state affect on diurnal cortisol slope among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China.AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV,29(8),1034-1040.
MLA Chen,Lihua,et al."The effects of trait and state affect on diurnal cortisol slope among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China".AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV 29.8(2017):1034-1040.
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