UM
‘Mixed blessings’: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective
Bornstein,Marc H.1; Putnick,Diane L.1; Lansford,Jennifer E.2; Al-Hassan,Suha M.3,4; Bacchini,Dario5; Bombi,Anna Silvia6; Chang,Lei7; Deater-Deckard,Kirby8; Di Giunta,Laura9; Dodge,Kenneth A.10; Malone,Patrick S.10; Oburu,Paul11; Pastorelli,Concetta6; Skinner,Ann T.10; Sorbring,Emma12; Steinberg,Laurence13,14; Tapanya,Sombat15; Tirado,Liliana Maria Uribe6,16; Zelli,Arnaldo17; Alampay,Liane Peña18
2019-06-19
Source PublicationJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
ISSN14697610 00219630
Volume58Issue:8Pages:880-892
AbstractBackground: Most studies of the effects of parental religiousness on parenting and child development focus on a particular religion or cultural group, which limits generalizations that can be made about the effects of parental religiousness on family life. Methods: We assessed the associations among parental religiousness, parenting, and children's adjustment in a 3-year longitudinal investigation of 1,198 families from nine countries. We included four religions (Catholicism, Protestantism, Buddhism, and Islam) plus unaffiliated parents, two positive (efficacy and warmth) and two negative (control and rejection) parenting practices, and two positive (social competence and school performance) and two negative (internalizing and externalizing) child outcomes. Parents and children were informants. Results: Greater parent religiousness had both positive and negative associations with parenting and child adjustment. Greater parent religiousness when children were age 8 was associated with higher parental efficacy at age 9 and, in turn, children's better social competence and school performance and fewer child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. However, greater parent religiousness at age 8 was also associated with more parental control at age 9, which in turn was associated with more child internalizing and externalizing problems at age 10. Parental warmth and rejection had inconsistent relations with parental religiousness and child outcomes depending on the informant. With a few exceptions, similar patterns of results held for all four religions and the unaffiliated, nine sites, mothers and fathers, girls and boys, and controlling for demographic covariates. Conclusions: Parents and children agree that parental religiousness is associated with more controlling parenting and, in turn, increased child problem behaviors. However, children see religiousness as related to parental rejection, whereas parents see religiousness as related to parental efficacy and warmth, which have different associations with child functioning. Studying both parent and child views of religiousness and parenting are important to understand the effects of parental religiousness on parents and children.
Keywordchild adjustment parenting religion Religiousness reporter
DOI10.1111/jcpp.12705
URLView the original
Language英语
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Document TypeJournal article
CollectionUniversity of Macau
Corresponding AuthorBornstein,Marc H.
Affiliation1.Child and Family ResearchEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentNational Institutes of HealthPublic Health Service,Bethesda,United States
2.Center for Child and Family PolicyDuke University,Durham,United States
3.Hashemite University,Zarqa,Jordan
4.Emirates College for Advanced Education,Abu Dhabi,United Arab Emirates
5.Second University of Naples,Naples,Italy
6.Rome University La Sapienza,Rome,Italy
7.University of Macau,Macau,Macao
8.University of Massachusetts at Amherst,Amherst,United States
9.Department of PsychologyRome University La Sapienza,Rome,Italy
10.Duke University,Durham,United States
11.Maseno University,Maseno,Kenya
12.University West,Trollhättan,Sweden
13.Temple University,Philadelphia,United States
14.King Abdulaziz University,Jeddah,Saudi Arabia
15.Chiang Mai University,Chiang Mai,Thailand
16.Universidad San Buenaventura,Bogotá,Colombia
17.University of Rome Foro Italico,Rome,Italy
18.Ateneo de Manila University,Quezon City,Philippines
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Bornstein,Marc H.,Putnick,Diane L.,Lansford,Jennifer E.,et al. ‘Mixed blessings’: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective[J]. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines,2019,58(8):880-892.
APA Bornstein,Marc H..,Putnick,Diane L..,Lansford,Jennifer E..,Al-Hassan,Suha M..,Bacchini,Dario.,...&Alampay,Liane Peña.(2019).‘Mixed blessings’: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective.Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines,58(8),880-892.
MLA Bornstein,Marc H.,et al."‘Mixed blessings’: parental religiousness, parenting, and child adjustment in global perspective".Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines 58.8(2019):880-892.
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