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Microbleeds in fronto-subcortical circuits are predictive of dementia conversion in patients with vascular cognitive impairment but no dementia
Chen, Yang-Kun1; Xiao, Wei-Min1; Li, Wei1; Ni, Zhuo-Xin1,2; Liu, Yong-Lin1; Xu, Li1; Qu, Jian-Feng1; Ng, Chee H.3; Xiang, Yu-Tao4
2018-11
Source PublicationNEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH
ISSN1673-5374
Volume13Issue:11Pages:1913-1918
AbstractCerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a common etiology of vascular cognitive impairment with no dementia (V-CIND). Studies have revealed that cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), a feature of CSVD, contribute to cognitive impairment. However, the association between CMBs and dementia conversion in individuals with V-CIND is still unclear. Here, we analyzed the predictive role of CMBs in the conversion from V-CIND to dementia in CSVD patients. We recruited and prospectively assessed 85 patients with CSVD and V-CIND. V-CIND was evaluated using a series of comprehensive neuropsychological scales, including the Chinese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Clinical Dementia Rating. MRI assessments were used to quantify lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, CMBs, and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Eighty-two of the 85 patients completed the assessment for dementia conversion at a 1-year follow-up assessment. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine independent clinical and MRI variables associated with dementia conversion. Twenty-four patients (29.3%) had converted to dementia at the 1-year follow-up, and these individuals had significantly more CMBs in the fronto-subcortical circuits. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the patients with CMBs in the fronto-subcortical circuits (odds ratio = 4.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.602-12.081, P = 0.004) and 5 or more CMBs overall (odds ratio = 17.6, 95% confidence interval: 3.23-95.84, P = 0.001) had a significantly increased risk of dementia at the 1-year follow-up. These findings indicate that CMBs in the fronto-subcortical circuits may be predictive of dementia conversion in CSVD patients with V-CIND, and thus extend the clinical significance of CMBs.
Keywordcerebrovascular disease stroke cerebral microbleeds cognitive impairment fronto-subcortical circuits small vessel disease white matter hyperintensities lacunar infarct magnetic resonance imaging subcortical ischemic vascular disease
DOI10.4103/1673-5374.239441
URLView the original
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaCell Biology ; Neurosciences & Neurology
WOS SubjectCell Biology ; Neurosciences
WOS IDWOS:000452511900012
PublisherWOLTERS KLUWER MEDKNOW PUBLICATIONS
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Citation statistics
Document TypeJournal article
CollectionUniversity of Macau
Affiliation1.South Med Univ, Affiliated Dongguan Hosp, Dongguan Peoples Hosp, Dept Neurol, Dongguan, Guangdong, Peoples R China;
2.Guangdong Med Univ, Fac Neurol, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, Peoples R China;
3.Univ Melbourne, Dept Psychiat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;
4.Univ Macau, Fac Hlth Sci, Taipa, Macao, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Chen, Yang-Kun,Xiao, Wei-Min,Li, Wei,et al. Microbleeds in fronto-subcortical circuits are predictive of dementia conversion in patients with vascular cognitive impairment but no dementia[J]. NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH,2018,13(11):1913-1918.
APA Chen, Yang-Kun.,Xiao, Wei-Min.,Li, Wei.,Ni, Zhuo-Xin.,Liu, Yong-Lin.,...&Xiang, Yu-Tao.(2018).Microbleeds in fronto-subcortical circuits are predictive of dementia conversion in patients with vascular cognitive impairment but no dementia.NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH,13(11),1913-1918.
MLA Chen, Yang-Kun,et al."Microbleeds in fronto-subcortical circuits are predictive of dementia conversion in patients with vascular cognitive impairment but no dementia".NEURAL REGENERATION RESEARCH 13.11(2018):1913-1918.
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